Livestreaming St. Anna Orthros & Divine Liturgy

During the past 2 days we have been working on setting-up and testing out the possibility of using our St. Anna Facebook Page to “Livestream” Sunday morning services beginning this weekend at 9:00am (Orthros) and continuing through the Divine Liturgy which begins at 10am. You will be able to view and participate in the prayers and hymns being offered during these services on the St. Anna Facebook Page. If you are not yet connected to the St. Anna Facebook Page please go to this site and “LIKE” this page to receive notifications when the Livestreaming has started on Sunday: https://www.facebook.com/StAnnaOrthodoxColumbiaTN/
We will be sending out the weekly bulletin and service hymn sheet later today or tomorrow so you are able to print it off (if desired) or use it to aid you in your prayers during the services. Those who have been offering online Orthodox Church services in their churches for several years have suggested that we urge our parishioners to stand, if you are able, as you would during the services in the Orthodox Church temple, especially during the litanies and readings of the Gospel lessons. It is important to approach these special accommodations for participating in these services from your home differently than you would from other videos or TV you might watch. You are NOT simply WATCHING the clergy and chanters “do Orthros and Liturgy”. Please join us in offering these hymns and prayers to God and the Saints on your behalf, one another and for all of the world. Reciting the prayers and singing the hymns that you know, along with us will minister to your souls, further unite us as a parish (in diaspora) and amplify the effectiveness of our corporate prayers. Also, please consider gathering your family together, viewing the livestreaming in the same room and lighting candles or burning incense at your home icon corner or altar during the services. We all expect this to be a “short-term” adjustment but we can make the most of our current situation and still share in our Lenten journey as we set aside this time for the special accommodations which are being made during these days. Our services will not be “professional video productions” but we will do what we are able to make adjustments to our set-up, equipment and technical options to try to minimize the distractions and limitations we will likely encounter as we livestream these services. Your patience and feedback will be treasured during these days. Those of us working on this video option are not filmmakers or videographers but we are being advised by those who are as we work through this with their help.

Becoming Truly Human Discussion Group Ministry Leaders Training Workshop

St. Anna Orthodox Christian Church – 700 Woodland St, Columbia, TN 38401, 3 Wednesdays: Oct 2, 16, 30; 6:30-8:30 pm (Please plan to attend ALL 3 Wednesday sessions)
During these three 2-hour session those in attendance will learn how to arrange a warm and welcoming discussion group environment, how to ask great questions which will foster open and honest discussions about important life issues, and how to anticipate and deal with possible pitfalls in many discussion groups.
Attention will be given to where to hold the discussion groups, how to invite others to attend, how often to host the groups, and what time of year is best, and who should come (and who shouldn’t!). Then with the helpful guidance and ongoing support of our staff the discussion group leaders will be introduced to the online and telephone support and conference calls. To register: www.becomingtrulyhuman.com/register
Note: $25 donation per attendee is requested payable to “Truly Human, LLC” for materials

St. Anna Church School – Begins THIS Sunday

St. Anna Church School (Ages 3-9) – Begins THIS Sunday, September 15 at 8:45am.

Introducing…….  (You and your child are going to LOVE this!)

St. Anna Church School – “Catechesis of the Good Shepherd” Method

Catechesis of the Good Shepherd is a common religious experience involving children and adults in which the religious values of childhood, primarily those values of contemplation and enjoyment of God, are predominant. This experience is shared in a place particularly prepared for the religious life of children called the Atrium.

The Child – God and the child have a unique relationship with one another particularly before the age of six. The growth of this relationship should be assisted by the adult, but is directed by the Spirit of God within the child. Children need their own place to foster the growth of that relationship. This spiritual growth is best served through tangible but indirect means. “If we want to help the child grow near to God, we should, with patience and courage…seek to go always closer to the vital nucleus of things. This requires study and prayer. The child himself will be our teacher if we know how to observe him.” Sofia Cavalletti

The Atrium – The Atrium (or prepared environment) is one of the important elements that helps the relationship between God and the child to flourish. After a theme has been presented, the child is free to choose an activity that will make possible the inner dialogue with the “Interior Teacher.” How does the atrium help to nourish this relationship? ~ The atrium can be compared to a retreat house facilitating recollection and silence. ~ The atrium is a place for religious life, for community and worship—not a classroom for instruction. ~ The atrium is a place of meaningful work through which the child can have a conversation with God. ~ The atrium was the place in the early church where the catechumens were prepared. For the child, too, the atrium is a place of preparation for involvement in the larger worship community.

The Adult – The catechist’s role is to prepare the environment and to give selected presentations from scripture and liturgy that “call forth” the child’s response rather than “pour in” information.  The catechist listens with the child and together they ask, “God, who are you? How do you love us?” The adult reflects with the child on the questions generated by the presentations with the materials offered to the child to aid the child’s reflection. The catechists work together in a spirit of unity and harmony, in tune with God’s plan for communion in the history of salvation and in keeping with the themes of unity so strongly expressed in the parables of the Good Shepherd (John 10:1ff) and the True Vine. (John 15: 1ff) They generously offer their talents and experience for the good of all.

A Catechesis Born of Joy – The Catechesis of the Good Shepherd was born from the joy of the children in their encounter with God and lives in being nourished by this joy. It has also been observed that children of the same developmental stage even though belonging to different cultural backgrounds, respond to certain elements of the Christian message in the same way. Over time through being with children in a specially prepared environment called an atrium, observing and listening to their responses, scriptural and liturgical themes developed that most resonated with children’s religious needs according to their age levels. Thus the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd divests itself of any strictly scholastic character, so as to become an experience of life, an education in faith, and a celebration of the encounter with the Father, in listening to Jesus, the one Teacher, and in obedience to the Holy Spirit.

God and the Child with the Adult – An interpersonal relationship is always a mystery, all the more so when that relationship is between God and the child. We believe that there is a deep bond between God and the child which produces in the child the desire to draw nearer to God. The catechist’s role is to prepare the environment and to give selected presentations from scripture and liturgy that “call forth” the child’s response rather than “pours in” information. The catechist listens with the child and together they ask, “God, who are you? How do you love us?” The adult reflects with the child on the questions generated by the presentations with the materials offered to the child to aid the child’s reflection. The atrium (or prepared environment) is one of the important elements that help the relationship between God and the child to flourish. After a theme has been presented, the child is free to choose an activity that will make possible the inner dialogue with the “Interior Teacher.”

Taken from: http://www.cgsusa.org

For more information about Orthodox Catechesis of the Good Shepherd please go to:  http://www.cgsusa.org/discover/cgs-and-ecumenism/cgs-in-the-orthodox-tradition/

Bishop NICHOLAS’ First Visit to St. Anna

On the occasion of our very first Episcopal visit at St Anna Orthodox Christian Church, His Grace Bishop NICHOLAS prayed Great Vespers with us on Sunday, August 18, 2019. Truly an historic event for the first known Orthodox Christian Bishop to ever visit and pray in Columbia, TN! We were encouraged to remain faithful to God, pray for those in our community and invite them to join us.

Dormition of The Theotokos Liturgy

Just a reminder that we will celebrate the Divine Liturgy for the Dormition of the Theotokos on Wednesday, August 14 at 6:30pm.  Please join us if you are able.

“Verily, the God-mantled Apostles were caught up on all sides, ascending the clouds by a divine sign. And they came up to thy most pure, life-originating resting-place to kiss it reverently. As for the most sublime heavenly powers, they came with their own chief. To escort, enwrapped in awe, thine all-honored, God-receiving body, they went before in a super-earthly manner, shouting invisibly to the heavenly ranks: Behold the Queen of all, the divine Maiden, has come. Lift up the gates and receive super-earthly-wise the Mother of everlasting Light. For through her hath salvation come to the whole human race. And she is the one on whom it is impossible to gaze, and whom we never can honor sufficiently. For the honor through which she became sublime transcendeth all understanding. Wherefore, O undefiled Theotokos, everlasting with thy life-bearing Son, intercede with Him unceasingly that He may preserve and save thy new people from every hostile assault; for we have taken thee unto us as our helper. Therefore, do we magnify thee with voices of joy unto all ages.”
 – DOXASTICON FOR THE DORMITION, from Great Vespers for the Feast of the Dormition of the Theotokos